GUF requests repeat: Recycling program looks for continued funding through 2011

Greening Up Fort St. James (GUF) asked council for another letter of support in order to request repeated funding for the upcoming year.

GUF board member Colleen Mullin and Recycling Coordinator Jana Gainor made a presentation to council on Wednesday to report on their past year and to request further support for their 2011 proposal.

Greening Up Fort St. James (GUF) asked council for another letter of support in order to request repeated funding for the upcoming year.

GUF board member Colleen Mullin and Recycling Coordinator Jana Gainor made a presentation to council on Wednesday to report on their past year and to request further support for their 2011 proposal.

GUF is requesting funding for April 1, 2011 until December 31, 2011 to continue the program as it is.

Focussing on fibre volume and project sustainability. The recycling of cardboard and paper and bin rentals is estimated at $3,528 and the total expenses they are expecting within that time frame is $51,516.

They hope to generate about $1,100 in revenue to offset those costs through the fibre recycling.

In the future, GUF still hopes to purchase a bailer in order to increase their efficiency of recycling materials and is still looking in to a building to house some of their operations and further growth.

“It is a collaborative effort between the district, the town, different businesses in the town (and GUF),” said Mullin.

Cardboard and paper bins have been in the community since November 21, 2010, and have been picked up and emptied five times since then.

The cost for each pick up is $1,057, and 10.22 metric tonnes of fibre have been collected and diverted from the landfill. The bins fill up every three weeks so far on average.

The bin manager and recycling coordinator positions have greatly increased the efficiency of the pickups, doubling the amount of fibre in the bins.

Eighteen local businesses have signed on to implement recycling in their workplaces, some schools are participating and a user-paid service has been created which will pick up the cardboard from local businesses and take it to the bins. Revenue from the pick ups has been $183.60.

According to Gainor, GUF has learned a lot in the past year about which different recyclable materials are of more value and easier to process, and about how the community is “excited about the program and eager to see the program grow.”

The first year has been about building relationships, said Gainor, and GUF has been working with First Nations communities, with schools, businesses and residents to implement the program.

Mayor Sandra Harwood inquired about how a bylaw stopping district pickup of cardboard would effect GUF’s program.

Mullin did agree that in order to make the recycling program sustainable, they will need to greatly increase their fibre supply, she also said they are working to get larger volume cardboard using industry and businesses to sign on to increase the cardboard going into the program and not the landfill.

 

“It’s gonna take awhile to build that volume and get those commitments,” said Mullin.