Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure looking at a climbing lane for Highway 27

After meeting with industry and elected officials last month, the Ministry of Transportation looking at putting in a climbing lane to accommodate commercial traffic.

After meeting with industry and elected officials last month, the Ministry of Transportation looking at putting in a climbing lane to accommodate commercial traffic.

The ministry is now working on a cost-benefit analysis, according to Rick Blixrud, regional director for Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure for the northern region, after industry gave clear recommendations on where they want a climbing lane put in.

The ministry had already commissioned what amounts to an aerial photographic survey of the area after a discussion last August, and from that they generate a digital terrain maps which allows them to do some initial design.

Their engineering staff are now doing a preliminary assessment of the site for the proposed climbing lane.

The next step will be to do an actual speed profile of the spot and a traffic count to see how much and what specific type of traffic is traveling the highway at that site.

Once the data is all collected, a technical review is done and a cost-benefit analysis is created. 

The cost-benefit analysis will provide the basis for the area to compete for the necessary provincial funding.

Blixrud is also planning a meeting with the mayor and officials from the Fort to talk about options to improve the traffic flow and safety through the Fort itself.

They will have a brainstorming session to see what improvements will be acceptable to the community.

Due to the highway being within the boundary of Fort St. James proper, any changes to the road would be first discussed with the mayor before proceeding.

A recent corridor study in Vanderhoof, prompted by accidents on Burrard Street, led to changes in the signal phasing and painted corridors.