Order disorder?

Is there really a technicality which precludes Mr. Campbell’s eligibility for this award? Are there really two sets of rules regarding this award? One for the Liberals and one for the rest of B.C.?

Editor:

A little piece of news has crossed my email regarding the appointment of Gordon Campbell, former premier of B.C., to the Order of British Columbia, and I feel I must respond to it.

There is currently an online campaign to argue his nomination and appointment to the Order is against the rules of the Order itself.

Is the following true?  Is there really a technicality which precludes Mr. Campbell’s eligibility for this award?  Are there really two sets of rules regarding this award?  One for the Liberals and one for the rest of B.C.?

How is it possible that Campbell can even be nominated to receive the award, never mind be chosen as a recipient?

According to the provincial government’s own Order of British Columbia website, nominations for the 2011 awards closed March 10, 2011, and “your nominee must not currently be an elected person with federal, provincial or municipal governments”.

Gordon Campbell did not step down as MLA, clearing the way for Christy Clark to run in his riding of Vancouver-Point Gray, until March 15. Thus, at the close of nominations he was “currently an elected person.”

The response should have been to send a letter to the nominator, thanking them for the submission and pointing out that Mr. Campbell was ineligible for 2011 and inviting them to resubmit for 2012. Breaking the nomination rules is simply another example of how there is one set of rules for the Liberals and their buddies, and another for the rest of us.

Please rescind this year’s nomination. He can be nominated again next year, if necessary.

If the nominations were closed on March 10, then you must rescind this award and let him be nominated next year.

 

Mike Summers

 

 

From the Editor:

When asked how this would happen, a spokesperson from the Government Communications and Public Engagement office, said they use the Provincial Symbols and Honours Act to decide eligibility for the award.

Section 16 states anyone can be nominated and section 17 (2) states: “A person who is an elected federal, provincial or municipal representative is not eligible to be appointed a member of the Order while that person remains in office.”

Campbell was appointed to the Order on September 2, and he was not in office at that time.

The spokesperson, who asked not to be quoted, emphasized the use of the act not the website, which is written in common language.