B.C. Transportation Minister Claire Trevena (Black Press)

B.C. bus service applications to be fast-tracked after Greyhound pullout

Greyhound’s departure leaves few options for small communities

The B.C. Passenger Transportation Board will move applications “to the front of the line” encourage inter-city bus companies to pick up routes that Greyhound Canada leaves behind at the end of October.

An “urgent public need process” is available for rural or remote corridors, where applicants don’t have to publish the required notice to be considered, said Catharine Read, chair of the board, in a statement Wednesday.

Transportation Minister Claire Trevena said Tuesday she expects “nimble and quick” response from smaller bus services to fill in the gap left by Greyhound’s departure.

The application procedure is explained on the board’s website.

Trevena said the solution would not be an expansion of B.C. Transit services.

RELATED: Market can fill Greyhound vacuum, minister says

Greyhound Canada announced last week it is shutting down all service from northern Ontario west. It had earlier stopped routes in northern B.C. and on Vancouver Island.

BC Transit’s service on Highway 16 to replace Greyhound service that ended in June is a pilot project for that region only, and private services are being sought to take up the other areas, Trevena said.

The last Greyhound bus pulled out of Terrace on June 1 with a single passenger on board, symbolizing the struggle of long-haul bus service in parts of the province. B.C.’s Passenger Transportation Board approved cancelling seven B.C. routes that Greyhound said had accumulated losses of $70 million in the past six years.

B.C. Bus North began interim service on June 4, with two round trips a week between Prince Rupert and Prince George, Prince George and Valemount and Prince George to Dawson Creek and Fort St. John.

Just Posted

Editorial: It’s high time we made sure more voices are heard

Is voting rocket science? The number of voters who cast ballots in… Continue reading

Two new housing projects receive funding in Vanderhoof

34 affordable rental units to be built for seniors and families

‘The Art of Forestry’ on now at Pope Mountain Arts Centre

Local art show opening reception saw record turnout

Nathan Cullen named Parliamentarian of the Year

Skeena-Bulkley Valley MP won the top-title Nov. 5

Province not doing enough for forestry sector, say Liberals

Although Minister of Forests says government working to diversify industry, rural economies

Feds give formal notice for law to end Canada Post strike

Trudeau government ready to legislate employees back to work after five weeks of rotating strikes

Getzlaf lifts Ducks to 4-3 win over skidding Canucks

Vancouver now winless since Nov. 8

Pressure builds for B.C. to recognize physicians assistants

“We can make a difference and I think we’re being overlooked.”

Senators urge Trump to expedite congressional vote on USMCA

The 12 Republican senators are warning of the dangers of getting the trade pact approved in 2019

Bill just one tool to deter foreign interference in Canadian elections: Gould

Bill C-76 is just one means to deter outside interference in Canadian elections

Investigation into B.C. legislature officers began in January

RCMP brought in months after former prison administrator started

Legal challenge filed over high-stakes competition to design $60B warships

The federal government had originally said it wanted a “mature design” for its new warship fleet, which was widely interpreted as meaning a vessel that has already been built and used by another navy.

‘There has to be accountability’: victims of sterilization demand action

Morningstar Mercredi says she woke up from a surgery at 14 and immediately broke down when she discovered the baby she once felt inside of her was gone.

Former B.C. crime reporter pens debut children’s book

Thom Barker channels his giant dog’s phobias into theme exploring critical thinking

Most Read