The KEY to self esteem is confidence

The KEY outreach services offers a variety of workshops free to everyone. The self esteem workshop is a 13-part series.

Belinda Sam

Workshops offered at The KEY outreach centre have become a way for Fort St. James residents to increase their emotional and social well-being.

Offered as a free service,  The KEY’s Gift of Self Esteem workshop is a 13-part series and will continue to run every Monday from 11a.m to 1p.m. until September 29 with lunch provided for participants. Judy Cormier is the centre’s academic advisor and has noticed the difference the program is making.

“There is one lady who has attended every one and you can see her self confidence is growing. Even her physical demeanour is reflecting the growth of her emotional improvement. She is  making a real effort to apply the skills learned and there is real improvement here,” said Ms. Cormier.

The Knowledge Empowers You centre, located across from Spirit Square, is a resource for people to gain access to learning. In partnership with the College of New Caledonia, The Key offers a variety of classes and workshops on a wide range of topics. The self-esteem workshop is one of many, and offers individual sessions each with a different focus.

“The program is set up so that each module is self contained and can be beneficial in itself but they are even more beneficial as a complete program,” said Ms. Cormier.

Each week the workshop opens with a discussion about a particular topic such as managing emotions, balancing your life, principles of high performance and goal setting. A DVD series component walks participants through a course of self analysis learning. Individuals get their own module booklet to follow along with and through help of the discussions can fill out the take-charge-of-your-life worksheets.

“This type of self analysis leads to self awareness and self honesty,”  said Ms. Cormier.

Belinda Sam, 37, has faithfully attended every self-esteem workshop. “In just one hour you can learn a lot. We talk about drugs and what they do to your insides and your mind. It’s helped me deal with my past, what’s happening today and how I can change,” said Ms. Sam.

With an open-book policy in place, participants can engage in discussion but they don’t have to, said Susan Barfoot, an individual support worker at The KEY.

“Some people don’t like talking some do, it’s ok either way. They questionnaires help to elaborate on what your personally doing and how you can change. It focuses on myself, ‘I am totally responsible’,” said Ms. Barfoot.

Although the workshop has already been happening for a few weeks, anyone is welcome to join at any time. There are still seven workshops to choose from including the August 11 Worry Buster workshop.

“How you handle worrying is a reflection of self esteem and this workshop will help develop skills on how to better handle worries. Everyone worries so this one will be good for anyone. I’m definitely a worrier so it will be especially beneficial to me,” said Ms. Cormier.

Anyone interested in the Monday self esteem workshop or any other services offered at The KEY can drop in  Monday, Wednesday and Friday anytime between 9 a.m – 4 p.m.

 

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