B.C. teacher said he would use student to ‘whack’ two others on Grade 8 field trip

Campbell River teacher-on-call suspended three weeks after November 2018 incident

A Campbell River substitute teacher who said he wanted to use one student to “whack” two others during a Grade 8 field trip has had his teaching certificate suspended for one day.

Joshua Frederick Roland Laurin, a School District 72 teacher on call, was accompanying students on a field tip on Nov. 6, 2018, when he made comments overheard by some students, according to a B.C. Commissioner for Teacher Regulation consent resolution agreement.

The students of the unidentified class described the comments as “weird” and felt shocked, although they believed the teacher had been joking.

Other comments the students overheard included Laurin saying he did not like his job or being around kids, and that he liked Grade 8 because he could leave students with worksheets.

Laurin also said he would like to use one of the students “to beat two other students to death and to injure a third one” and use one of the students to “whack” two others.

Finally, according to the document, he said if he were to die the next day, he would want to hurt students beforehand as he would not get into any trouble.

The school district issued him a letter of discipline and suspended him from the on-call list from Dec. 3 until Dec. 21, 2018. It also required him to complete a Justice Institute of B.C. course on professional boundaries, which he later completed.

The teacher regulation branch has now suspended his certificate for one day, on Oct. 24, 2019.

See the consent resolution agreement here.

RELATED: Lower Mainland teacher punished for mocking students, drinking before dry grad

RELATED: Vancouver Island teacher disciplined for physically restraining five-year-old


@AlstrT
editor@campbellrivermirror.com

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