Local vendors who frequently sell their locally made goods at the Fort St. James Farmers’ Market may directly benefit from the new relaunch of the Buy BC program. (Photo/Colin Macgillivray

Buy BC relaunches to keep business local

Local farmers’ markets may benefit

Buy BC programming is being officially relaunched, under the overarching goal of boosting B.C.’s agriculture industry while also fuelling public interest in shopping for locally made and crafted British Columbia products.

According to a news release issued by the Ministry of Agriculture, Buy BC, which is being delivered in partnership with the British Columbia Restaurant and Food Services Association (BCRFA), was particularly popular with B.C. growers and producers before it was cancelled in the early 2000s.

The idea behind bringing back the brand power of this marketing campaign is that it will ultimately make it easier for British Columbians to discover and try fresh and unique products from around the province.

The relaunch was recently announced by the Minister of Agriculture Lana Popham, who was joined by Vickey Brown, BC Association of Farmers’ Markets vice-president and local vendors and market goers in Moss Street Market in Victoria.

“The goal is to connect more British Columbians and visitors with the great food and drinks made right here in B.C.,” said Popham. “When people are making their shopping decisions, we want them to reach for B.C. products.

“Much has changed since the program was cancelled more than a decade ago,” continued Popham. “There are new types of B.C. producers and products that we think British Columbians and visitors will fall in love with. And Buy BC will be instrumental in introducing those products to British Columbians and a global audience.”

The Buy BC Partnership Program involves cost-shared funding that is not only available to agriculture and seafood producers, processors and co-operative across the province, but will also be particularly relevant for industry associations, agricultural fairs and markets within B.C., like the Fort St. James Farmers’ Market.

For those local vendors who are constantly supplying fresh produce and locally made goods at the Fort St. James market, the return of the nearly two-decade old program will offer numerous new opportunities.

“We are thrilled to see this support for B.C. farmers, growers and makers of local food that can be found at over 145 community farmers’ markets across the province,” said Wylie Bystedt, the president of the BC Association of Farmers’ Markets. “More and more British Columbians are seeking out unique, local, in-season foods and the Buy BC Partnership Program will make it easier to choose these foods, which is an integral part of ensuring a thriving local food sector in B.C.”

Per information provided in the news release, the Buy BC Partnership Program will provide $2 million in funding per year over the next three years. This funding aims to help eligible applicants with marketing efforts by using the Buy BC logo on their products or promotional materials.

“The Ministry of Agriculture’s three pillars of Grow BC, Feed BC and Buy BC are supporting the province’s agriculture sectors and encouraging British Columbians to choose B.C. products which in turn, support our local farmers and ranchers,” said Stan Vander Waal the president of the BC Agriculture Council. “Placing the Buy BC partnership logo on B.C. products strengthens the local brand and reminds consumers that we grow and raise some of the most trusted and highest-quality product in the world.”

The provincial government’s Buy BC Partnership Program will be administered and carried out by the Investment Agriculture Foundation of British Columbia, with the support of the Ministry of Agriculture, per the news release.

Just Posted

Gitxsan forming cross-sector salmon management team

Nation again declares closure of fishery in territory for 2019

Editorial: The Speaker shouldn’t be an MLA

Time to re-evaluate the Speaker position

Column: condition of cows after winter feeding

The protein content of winter feed is important, says rancher David Zirnhelt

Concept designs for Vanderhoof’s new CNC campus unveiled

Community was invited to provide feedback at a public engagement session Dec. 6

It’s the last day to vote in B.C.’s referendum on electoral reform

Ballots must now be dropped off in person to meet the deadline of 4:30 p.m.

VIDEO: This B.C. school leads country in vaccine donations to UNICEF

Federally funded Kids Boost Immunity uses quizzes to earn vaccinations

In Canada, the term ‘nationalism’ doesn’t seem to have a bad rap. Here’s why

Data suggest that Canadians don’t see the concept of nationalism the way people do in the United States

Small quake recorded west of Vancouver Island

No injuries or tsunami warning after 5.4 rumble felt some 400 kilometres from Victoria

B.C. suspends Chinese portion of Asian forestry trade mission due to Huawei arrest

Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou was detained at the request of U.S. in Vancouver

Canadians spent $1.7 billion dollars online in December 2017

Online retail sales accounted for 3.4 per cent of total retail sales

2-year investigations nets $900,000 in refunds for payday loan customers

Consumer Protection BC says selling practices were ‘aggressive and deceptive’

China: Canada’s detention of Huawei exec ‘vile in nature’

Huawei is the biggest global supplier of network gear for phone and internet company

1 of 2 B.C. men wanted in connection to home invasion, explosives in custody

Cameron Cole is charged with two counts of possessing an improvised explosive device

Judge rules private landowners can’t block public access to B.C. lake

The Nicola Valley ranch’s position was that it owned Stoney Lake and Minnie Lake

Most Read