UPDATED: Health Canada looking into B.C. boy’s treatment of rabid dog saliva

BC Naturopathic Association questions Dr. Anke Zimmermann’s conduct on recent treatments

UPDATED: A Health Canada spokesperson said Friday the agency is investigating this case.

The company that reportedly sold Zimmerman the saliva treatment is not licensed for any such products, according to Health Canada’s database of licensed natural health products.

“Based on the information provided, Health Canada is opening a case for follow-up,” said Maryse Durette in an email. “Should the department identify any non-compliance with the Food and Drugs Act or the Natural Health Products Regulations, it will take action.”

The sale of an unlicensed natural health product could net you fines of up to $5000 or imprisonment up to three years.

———————————————

The B.C. Naturopath Association says it has filed a complaint to the industry’s regulator against a Victoria-based naturopath who said she has treated a four-year-old boy with rabid dog saliva.

Dr. Anke Zimmerman, a licensed naturopathic physician of 36 years, told Black Press Media earlier this week the boy had displayed signs of aggression, licking his mother and growling at people, after he’d been bitten dogs multiple times in his young life.

She confirmed what she posted on her website – that she decided to treat him with lyssinum, a diluted remedy of rabid dog saliva, and that his mother later reported his behaviour had improved.

READ MORE: Victoria naturopath treats boy with rabid dog saliva

“Dr. Zimmerman’s statements on her website and to the media have raised the concerns of B.C.’s provincial health officer and minister of health,” BCNA co-president Dr. Victor Chan said in a release Thursday.

“We are concerned that certain statements and posts she has made, in person and online, appear to be contrary to the public interest in the practice of the profession – and therefore require action on the part of the regulator to intervene.”

Zimmermann is not a member of the association, Chan said.

The College of Naturopathic Physicians of B.C. confirmed she was licensed, adding lyssinum has is accepted form of homeopathic treatment. It is also approved by Health Canada.

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry has questioned Zimmermann’s methods as well, saying she plans to write to Health Canada on the approval of lyssinum.

More to come.

Just Posted

Move natural gas pipeline, MP suggests

Coastal GasLink could then avoid opposition

B.C. minister says rural internet is ‘railroad of the 21st century’

Jinny Sims talks details about the $50-million provincial and possible $750-million federal funds

Zero-interest student loans a huge relief: CMTN student union

Parliamentary secretary hears from Terrace students, alumni and staff

Tl’azt’en man emerges strong from leukemia struggle

“You have to find that inner you and fight back,” Darren says

WANTED: Five sought by RCMP

Police asking for public’s assistance finding five people on outstanding warrants.

After mosque attacks, New Zealand bans ‘military-style’ guns

The gunman killed 50 in a Christchurch mosque

Pot industry welcomes decreased edibles tax, but unhappy medical tax remains

Taxes can increase the cost of medical cannabis by as much as 25 per ceny

‘It has to send a message:’ Broncos families await sentencing for truck driver

Jaskirat Singh Sidhu pleaded guilty to 29 counts of dangerous driving and apologized in court

MPs continue voting marathon as Tories protest shutdown of Wilson-Raybould motion

Multiple MPs have resigned from Trudeau’s Liberal cabinet

Canucks hang on for 7-4 win over Senators

Horvat nets 2 for Vancouver

European, Canadian regulators to do own review of Boeing jet

Air Canada plans to remove the Boeing 737 Max from its schedule at least through July 1

Prime minister defends Liberal budget measures as sales effort gets underway

Conservatives under Andrew Scheer say it’s a spree funded by borrowing against the future

Mayor meets with B.C. health minister on homeless taxi transfers

Two homeless people were discharged from Surrey Memorial and sent to a Chilliwack shelter

B.C. lottery winner being sued by co-workers

They claim he owes them $200,000 each, in a lawsuit filed in B.C. Supreme Court in Vancouver

Most Read