Funding received for mature workers

More mature workers in small communities will receive the training and support they need for local jobs.

  • Apr. 27, 2016 9:00 a.m.
(from left to right) Angel Ransom

(from left to right) Angel Ransom

Barbara Latkowski

Caledonia Courier

More mature workers in small communities will receive the training and support they need for local jobs.

An additional $4.1 million will go towards a Targeted Initiative for Older Worker Program, a successful cost-shared initiative between the Government of Canada and the province of British Columbia.

On April 19, at the College of New Caledonia in Fort St. James, the Minister of Aboriginal Relations and Reconciliation, John Rustad announced that due to its success, the Targeted Initiative for Older Worker Program has been extended to December 31, 2016.

The federal and provincial governments are providing an additional $4.1 million to 14 service providers delivering the TIOW program in 16 communities throughout B.C. including Fort St. James.

This is to ensure that unemployed older workers continue to receive support.

“These training initiatives are for everyone. It’s for meeting everyone’s needs in the future,” Rustad said.

“Older workers bring life experience, knowledge and wisdom to their jobs and extending this program will help them access the skills training they need to get jobs and participate in our diverse, strong and growing community.”

The TIOW Program was launched in 2007 to assist vulnerable communities that are facing labour-force adjustments due to changes in the local economy.

The program provides skills training and employment support to unemployed older workers, aged 55 to 64-years-old so they can pursue longer-term jobs, further education or career training.

This program not only benefits program participants, but will help local employers and their region as well as they gain the skilled workers they need to transform their economy.

The TIOW Program delivered by the College of New Caledonia in Fort St. James was recently recognised by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development as a successful example of support for older workers facing employment challenges in small communities.

Henry Reiser, President of the College of New Caledonia says that the College believes in the importance of providing equal access to training and work opportunities for everyone.

“We are very grateful to the Department of Employment and Social Development and the Ministry of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training for this funding,” Reiser said.

“Older workers have just as much need and desire to be engaged in their local economies and we confident that this funding will help ensure that.”

For more information about the program visit: http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/industry-and-services/local-economic-strategies-for-ageing-labour-markets