Funding will assist victims of violence

The Fireweed Safe Haven in Fort St. James—part of the Fireweed Collective Society—has received $10,000

  • Sep. 16, 2015 10:00 a.m.

Barbara Roden

Caledonia Courier

The Fireweed Safe Haven in Fort St. James—part of the Fireweed Collective Society—has received $10,000 in provincial finding to assist Aboriginal women and children trying to escape domestic violence.

Executive Director Brandi Hanterman is very excited about the funding, which will enable the Society to provide transportation for women and children who come to the haven for assistance. “It means we can offer transportation to medical and legal appointments, or for women who need to replace or obtain identification documents,” she says. “We can also use it to help high risk women leave the communities if they need to get out fast or it’s too dangerous for them here.”

The haven also provides support in helping to get women back on their feet. “It’s a very personalized service,” says Hanterman. “There are very different needs from one woman to another.”

Although the funding is targeted specifically at First Nations women and children, Hanterman says that non-Aboriginal women and children who face abuse are also welcome. “We can sit down with them and help them access the services they need.”

The $10,000 funding is being rolled out over two years, and Hanterman says the society is interested to see what it looks like going forward. “The lack of buses in Fort St. James means that in the past any transportation expenses have come from the society’s core costs. This funding makes it a lot easier for us to support women.” Staff provide the transportation, but Hanterman is open to working with other community groups, such as Northern Health, to see if some transport needs can be met that way.

“We’re very excited about this funding, which is great news,” says Hanterman. “There are so many women hitchhiking in this area, and this will help to stop that.”

Anyone wanting to contact the Fireweed Society and Safe Haven should call their crisis line at (250) 996-8000.

The Joy Aitkens Safe Home—a transition house for women and children leaving abuse in Vanderhoof—also received a $10,000 grant, as did the Eagle’s Nest Transition House in the Lakes District.

 

Just Posted

Shovel Lake wildfire, highway 27 and pipeline

It’s close to one and reached another

Robbery suspect arrested near Burns Lake

RCMP use spike belt to deflate vehicle’s tires

‘Beauty amongst such tragedy:’ B.C. photographer captures nature’s trifecta

David Luggi’s photo from a beach in Fraser Lake shows Shovel Lake wildfire, Big Dipper and an aurora

Four-legged evacuees, Vanderhoof

Local physician opens up her property for 60 dogs and numerous horses

Canadians fear for relatives trapped amid flooding in Indian state of Kerala

More than 800,000people have been displaced by floods and landslides

IndyCar driver Wickens flown to hospital after scary crash

IndyCar said Wickens was awake and alert as he was taken to a hospital

Ex-BCTF president ‘undeterred’ after early release from pipeline protest jail term

Susan Lambert and Order of Canada recipient Jean Swanson released early

Fast food chains look to capitalize on vegetarian, vegan trend with new items

Seven per cent of Canadians consider themselves vegetarians and 2.3 per cent identify as vegans

B.C. swimmer halts journey across Strait of Juan de Fuca after hypothermia sets in

Victoria MS athlete Susan Simmons swam for eight-and-a-half hours in 9 C choppy waters

‘Hard on water:’ Smoke not the only long-range effect of wildfires

The project began more than 10 years ago after southern Alberta’s 2003 Lost Creek fire

B.C. VIEWS: Genuine aboriginal rights are misused and discredited

Camp Cloud one of long line of protests falsely asserting title

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to march in Montreal’s Pride parade

Trudeau will end the day in his home riding of Papineau

Most Read