Holiday Lighting Tips From Hydro One

It’s time to get your home ready for the holidays!
Get your outdoor holiday lights up safely with these tips from Hydro One.

  • Dec. 2, 2015 9:00 a.m.

It’s time to get your home ready for the holidays!

Get your outdoor holiday lights up safely with these tips from Hydro One:

Always use Canadian Standards Association (CSA) approved lights, cords, plugs and sockets and are properly marked for outdoor or indoor use.

Do not overload circuits. Have no more than 1,400 watts on a circuit. If other lights in the house dim when the holiday lighting is turned on or the plug is very hot after unplugging it, your circuit is overloaded. To figure out a circuit’s load, multiply the number of bulbs by the watts per bulb, and add any lamps, appliances or other equipment on the same circuit.

Before you put light strings on a shrub, tree or your house, check for breaks or signs of insulation deterioration. Frayed cords or loose connections indicate that the wiring is poor. Replace any defective sets.

Never install lights with the power on. Test lights first, then unplug to install.

Keep electrical connections off the ground. Use eave clips or insulated staples, rather than nails and tacks, to hold light strings in place.

Keep wiring clear of metal parts such as ornamental railings and drainpipes, to prevent any risk of shock from an electrical current. Do not leave any light sockets empty if you want sections in your light string unlit. This can create a fire hazard or could be fatal if someone touches the inside of the empty socket. Instead place a burned-out bulb in the socket. This will not affect the other lights on the string.

Looking to save energy this holiday season? Make the switch to Light Emitting Diode (LED) holiday lights and enjoy significant energy and cost savings this winter. According to Natural Resources Canada, LEDs use 80% less energy than their incandescent counterparts, so now is the time to upgrade your old incandescent strings.

If you’re still not sure, consider this: incandescent bulbs waste a lot of energy – 90% of the energy they consume is used to heat the bulb, while only 10% is used for lighting. LEDs, by contrast, directly convert electricity to light without the use of a filament or glass bulb, resulting in less energy loss through heat.

LED light strings also last up to ten times longer than incandescent light strings. And because they don’t have moving parts, filaments or glass, they’re much more durable and shock-resistant than other light strings.

For additional tips on how to save energy or to download valuable coupons for energy saving products? Visit www.HydroOne.com/SaveEnergy.

 

 

Just Posted

Six Fort St. James students awarded scholarships for post-secondary education

Indigenous students awarded to further their studies

Coastal GasLink gets interim injunction against Unist’ot’en

The LNG pipeline company can start work Monday with enforcement approved by court.

Editorial: Go out and play

How much is too much screen time?

Fort St. James businesses get into the Christmas spirit with decorating contest

Northland Automotive Ltd. won first place in Fort St. James Chamber of… Continue reading

REPLAY: B.C’s best video this week

In case you missed it, here’s a look at the replay-worth highlights from this week across the province

Microscopic parasite found in Prince Rupert water affecting thousands

More than 12,000 residents affected by the boil water advisory issued Dec. 14

Trudeau lashes out at Conservatives over migration “misinformation”

Warning against the “dangers of populism,” Trudeau says using immigration as a wedge political issue puts Canada’s future at risk.

B.C. hockey coach creates ‘gear library’ to remove cost barrier of sport

Todd Hickling gathered donations and used gear to remove the cost barrier for kids to play hockey.

Canada’s ambassador meets with second detainee in China

Global Affairs says John McCallum, Canada’s ambassador to China, met with Spavor Sunday

‘They’re coming:’ Flying cars may appear in urban skies by 2023

Air taxis will number 15,000 and become a global market worth $32 billion by 2035

B.C. VIEWS: Andrew Wilkinson on taxes, ICBC and union changes

Opposition leader sees unpredictable year ahead in 2019

5 tips for self-care, mental wellness this holiday season

Ministry of Mental Health and Addictions urging British Columbians to prioritize self care through festive season

Rescued B.C. cat with misshapen legs in need of forever home – with carpet

Mirielle was born with misshapen back legs and after a tough life on the streets, is looking for a forever home.

Most Read