Holiday Lighting Tips From Hydro One

It’s time to get your home ready for the holidays!
Get your outdoor holiday lights up safely with these tips from Hydro One.

  • Dec. 2, 2015 9:00 a.m.

It’s time to get your home ready for the holidays!

Get your outdoor holiday lights up safely with these tips from Hydro One:

Always use Canadian Standards Association (CSA) approved lights, cords, plugs and sockets and are properly marked for outdoor or indoor use.

Do not overload circuits. Have no more than 1,400 watts on a circuit. If other lights in the house dim when the holiday lighting is turned on or the plug is very hot after unplugging it, your circuit is overloaded. To figure out a circuit’s load, multiply the number of bulbs by the watts per bulb, and add any lamps, appliances or other equipment on the same circuit.

Before you put light strings on a shrub, tree or your house, check for breaks or signs of insulation deterioration. Frayed cords or loose connections indicate that the wiring is poor. Replace any defective sets.

Never install lights with the power on. Test lights first, then unplug to install.

Keep electrical connections off the ground. Use eave clips or insulated staples, rather than nails and tacks, to hold light strings in place.

Keep wiring clear of metal parts such as ornamental railings and drainpipes, to prevent any risk of shock from an electrical current. Do not leave any light sockets empty if you want sections in your light string unlit. This can create a fire hazard or could be fatal if someone touches the inside of the empty socket. Instead place a burned-out bulb in the socket. This will not affect the other lights on the string.

Looking to save energy this holiday season? Make the switch to Light Emitting Diode (LED) holiday lights and enjoy significant energy and cost savings this winter. According to Natural Resources Canada, LEDs use 80% less energy than their incandescent counterparts, so now is the time to upgrade your old incandescent strings.

If you’re still not sure, consider this: incandescent bulbs waste a lot of energy – 90% of the energy they consume is used to heat the bulb, while only 10% is used for lighting. LEDs, by contrast, directly convert electricity to light without the use of a filament or glass bulb, resulting in less energy loss through heat.

LED light strings also last up to ten times longer than incandescent light strings. And because they don’t have moving parts, filaments or glass, they’re much more durable and shock-resistant than other light strings.

For additional tips on how to save energy or to download valuable coupons for energy saving products? Visit www.HydroOne.com/SaveEnergy.

 

 

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