ICBC campaign aims to keep youth safe

On average, 80 youth are injured and two are killed in crashes during April, May and June every year in northern B.C.

  • Apr. 8, 2013 10:00 a.m.

On average, 80 youth are injured and two are killed in crashes during April, May and June every year in northern B.C.

This statistic is what the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC) is aiming to impact as we head into the grad party season, when teens begin spending time outdoors partying and then have to make choices about how to get around.

This week is the first week ICBC road safety speakers will be visiting schools across northern B.C. to try and encourage youth to make better choices this spring and summer.

“It’s important that we do what we can to help B.C. youth understand the devastating impact one wrong decision could have on their lives and their families,” said Mary Polak, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure. “The reality is that car crashes are the number one preventable cause of death for youth in B.C. ICBC’s road safety speakers help strengthen young people’s decision-making skills and teach them to think twice before taking risks behind the wheel.”

“The driving challenges faced by northern and rural drivers are often extraordinary,” said Shirley Bond, Minister of Justice and Attorney General. “There’s snow on the ground for more time during the year, secondary roads, and a lot of people who enjoy recreational activities in the back country. That’s why it’s critical for young drivers to be absolutely sober when driving. ICBC’s road safety speakers drive home that message in a personal and compelling way.”

The ICBC program has been going on for 16 years, presenting to more than 50,000 high school students each year.

This year, ICBC is scheduled to bring a speaker to Fort St. James on May 27.

Road safety speakers