Polymer resin repair of rock chip costs about $70

ICBC to reinstate free windshield chip repairs

Transportation Minister Todd Stone says ICBC and its optional insurance customers will save money

Repairing rock chips at no charge will save ICBC and its customers money on windshield replacement claims, the Crown insurance agency says.

ICBC CEO Mark Blucher and Transportation Minister Todd Stone announced the new program in Kamloops Wednesday, saying it will save 8,000 windshields a year from being sent to landfills.

Details of the program won’t be released until later this spring, but ICBC optional insurance customers with vehicles up to 8,800 kg gross vehicle weight will be eligible, covering many light commercial vehicles as well as personal vehicles, Blucher said.

Windshield replacement claims jumped 17 per cent in 2016, and replacement costs have risen 28 per cent since 2010, according to ICBC. The average cost of a windshield replacement last year was $820, and a chip repair can be done for about $70.

ICBC customers with $300 deductible collision coverage pay $200 for a new windshield.

“The new program will have many benefits for our optional customers, including having no impact on their claims history or deductible,” Blucher said.

ICBC basic insurance rates are going up 4.9 per cent this year, a ceiling imposed by Stone as accident and personal injury claims continue to rise.

Stone said in an interview the harsh winter in B.C.’s Lower Mainland means windshield claims are likely to continue at a high rate, while the number of glass claims in the Interior has been “relatively flat.”

NDP critic Adrian Dix said the BC Liberal government introduced the charge for windshield repairs in 2001, and have been dinging customers ever since, especially in rural areas where rock damage to windshields is most prevalent every year.

“They have been sticking it to people in the Interior for 15 years, and now, a couple of months before the election, they decide to reinstate the NDP’s policy,” Dix said.

ICBC uses revenue from its optional coverage to subsidize basic vehicle insurance, and the offer of free windshield repairs may attract some people to switch from private competitors.

Stone said more than 80 per cent of B.C. drivers already have optional coverage through ICBC, and that share has been increasing in recent years. The main reason for the offer is an expected saving of $8 million a year by avoiding windshield replacements, he said.


Just Posted

B.C.’s north heats up to record highs

Bella Bella, Masset, Prince Rupert and the Cassiar Area all broke records

Special prosecutor appointed in Burns Lake mayor sex assault case

Luke Strimbold has been charged with numerous sex related charges

U.S. proposed steel, aluminum tariffs leave uncertainty for B.C. site

Rio Tinto has been operating in British Columbia for over 60 years, but tariffs cause fear

VIDEO: B.C. Mounties reunite veteran with lost military medals

RCMP say Zora Singh Tatla, who served in the army in India for 28 years, is the righful owner

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Experts urging caution as rabbits die by the hundreds in B.C. city

Province of B.C. confirms more positive tests for rabbit haemorrhagic disease

Federal government seeks public feedback on pedestrian safety

What safety measures do you think need to improved for pedestrians and cyclists?

Search continues for 10-year-old Montreal boy missing since Monday

Montreal police said they are exploring every possibility in search for Ariel Jeffrey Kouakou

Airline passenger-rights bill claws back protections for travellers: Advocate

Bill C-49 would double tarmac delays, scrap compensation for flights affected by mechanical failures

Canadian research vessel to explore 19th Century shipwrecks

Commissioned this week in Victoria, the RV David Thompson is Parks Canada’s newest vessel

VIDEO: ‘New wave’ of anti-pipeline protests return to Trans Mountain facility

About 100 demonstrators with Protect the Inlet marched to the Burnaby terminal Saturday

B.C. man to plead guilty in connection with hit-and-run that killed teen

Jason Gourlay charged with failure to stop at the scene of accident, attempting to obstruct justice

Most Read