LEGEBOKOFF TRIAL: Officer describes last meeting with victim

Testifying at a B.C. Supreme Court trial Thursday afternoon, an RCMP officer regularly on the beat in downtown

  • Jul. 2, 2014 7:00 p.m.

Teresa Mallam

Prince George Free Press

Testifying at a B.C. Supreme Court trial Thursday afternoon, an RCMP officer regularly on the beat in downtown Prince George said he saw and spoke with murder victim Jill Stuchenko, 35, for the last time in October 2009.

RCMP Const. Mike Hansen, a member in Prince George since 1995, said he’d known Stuchenko for several years but had not seen her for some time when he noticed her on Oct. 9, 2009 in the early evening, walking near Queensway. Her remains were found in a gravel pit off Otway Road on Oct. 26, 2009.

The two had a three- to five-minute “short conversation”, he said, adding she was making her way on foot heading towards Victoria Street.

Cody Alan Legebokoff, 24, is charged with the murders of Stuchenko and three other area women, Loren Leslie, Cynthia Maas and Natasha Montgomery. His trial, before a 14-person jury, began June 2.

Asked how he knew Stuchenko, the officer said she was “one of the street workers.”

He usually saw her in the vicinity of Juniper Street and the VLA area on streets such as Pine and Oak, he said.

During cross examination, defence lawyer James Heller referred Hansen to an interview he had given an RCMP colleague about Stuchenko after her body was discovered. He agreed he’d told the officer that Stuchenko was usually talkative and outgoing but on this final occasion was not.

“You knew she was a drug user?” asked Heller.

“Not directly … but I assumed so,” said Hansen.

“The last time you saw her, she wasn’t herself so to speak?”

Hansen agreed she was not.

In other testimony heard Thursday, RCMP. Sgt. John Took, a forensic identification specialist, described his involvement in an April 13-16, 2011 search of a Carney Street dwelling where an earlier witness said he first met Legebokoff (he was not named as a tenant).

The officer said he and his team used white light and coloured lasers in the thorough examination of the premises.

Shown a booklet of photographs taken by Cpl. Kimberley Tremblay (she testified earlier in the week), Took told the court he took measurements at the scene of all the rooms, made sketches of both floors of the house and later made them into computer generated diagrams.

The officer said they used white light, bright forensic light, ultraviolet and blue lights, forensic lasers, all different colours “as you see on T.V.” By darkening the room and using different light techniques and special goggles, it is possible to “better see things” without the distractions, he said.

The same approach was used upstairs and downstairs, he testified.

“[We] searched every room and every surface of that residence.”

Samples were taken to test for the potential of any blood evidence, in some cases  taking cuttings of carpet, he said.

The trial resumed July 2.

 

Just Posted

Province announces $100-million grant funding for Northwest communities

The Northern Capital and Planning Grant will go to four regional districts and 22 municipalities

Prince Rupert Gas Transmission project searches for partners

TransCanada is renewing permits for its natural gas pipeline project to North Coast.

Coastal GasLink stops work to investigate archaeological find

OGC archaeologists are en route to the Houston-area site where Unist’ot’en report finding stone tools

Coastal GasLink prepares sites of construction work camps

Unist’ot’en condemn 14 ‘man camps’ housing 500-800 workers as threatening safety of women and children

TSKLH Nation sues Province over Brucejack mine revenue sharing

The Tsetsaut/Skii km Lax Ha seeks to assert rights and title in the area around Pretivm gold mine.

Trudeau’s principal secretary, Gerald Butts, resigns amid SNC-Lavalin furor

Butts categorically denies the accusation that he or anyone else in the PMO improperly pressured former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould

Lost a ring? This B.C. man will find it for you

Chris Turner founded The Ring Finders, an international directory of metal detector hobbyists

Poverty coalition has high hopes for B.C. poverty reduction strategy

Funding allocation expected to be released with 2019 budget

‘How did we get here?’: B.C. mom of transplant recipient worries about measles outbreaks

Addison, 7, cannot get a live vaccine because she has a heart transplant

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh calls for public inquiry over SNC-Lavalin questions

Vancouver member of Parliament Jody Wilson-Raybould resigned from cabinet last week

Canadian airlines waiting for guidance from Ottawa over X gender option

Major U.S. airlines said they will change their process so passengers can identify themselves along non-binary lines

Moose Hide campaign takes message to Canadian schools

Campaign launches new K-12 education platform

‘Violent’ B.C. man wanted on Canada-wide warrant

Prince George man with ties to Vernon sought by police

Homicide police investigate assault turned deadly in Surrey

60-year-old man died at hospital after assault

Most Read