Pixabay photo

Caregivers banned from smoking, growing cannabis around children-in-care: MCFD

Ministry has limited cannabis use for caregivers, stating it may “pose a risk to children and youth.”

The Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) has limited cannabis consumption for caregivers.

Foster Parent Support Services Society (FPSSS), under the Ministry of Children and Family Development’s direction, has released newly amended policies surrounding cannabis legalization. The new policies are in anticipation of cannabis legalization on Oct. 17.

In FPSSS’ release, the society stated that MCFD “drafted/amended policy in consideration of the health and safety of the children and youth in our care and to align with the Province’s new cannabis legalization.”

For those directly involved in child care, MCFD has decided that “home cultivation of non-medical cannabis is banned in dwellings used as licensed child care.” The ministry also added that smoking or vaping cannabis within homes, cars, or other “enclosed spaces” with children present is prohibited for caregivers.

The newly amended policy will allow the ministry “to do a case-by-case assessment” for those foster caregivers and prospective adoptive families looking to grow cannabis. MCFD will also be able “to restrict the presence of cannabis in a home based on the particular needs of the child/youth in care,” the release added.

For those BC residents employed by MCFD for residential care, the policy will limit staff from cultivating in “the home in which the caretaker is employed.”

MCFD has also determined cannabis edibles are off limits as well since federal legislation has yet to cover it.

“Edibles may pose a risk to children and youth given that food items made with cannabis … are often indistinguishable from non-cannabis based food products,” the ministry said. Cannabis and cannabis products will be treated much the same as alcohol and tobacco within foster homes.

If a caretaker does, however, decide to make their own edible products, the ministry added, “the products must be safely and securely stored in a manner that is inaccessible to children/youth in the home.” MCFD workers will be delegated to ensure caretakers are storing the cannabis plants and products properly.

Cannabis legalization will allow BC residents over 19 years old to possess, purchase, grow and consume cannabis. Online cannabis sales will also be available through privately run retail stores or government-operated retail stores. Those over 19 years old will also be able to possess over 30 grams (a little over one ounce) of non-medical cannabis.

Adults will also be able to smoke or vape cannabis in public spaces, given tobacco smoking and vaping are allowed. Bans are in place for most municipalities, however, for smoking in parks, playgrounds, or other areas used by children. BC residents over 19 years old will also be allowed to grow up to four cannabis plants at a time in one household, given that the plants are not visible from public spaces.

Just Posted

2018 marks 100 years since the end of World War I

Quesnel legion’s historian Doug Carey documents some of the atrocities of WWI

Conifex announces a temporary curtailment in operations at Fort St. James mill

Between 180 and 200 people will be affected by the curtailment for at least four weeks

B.C. Legions in need of young members to continue aiding veterans into the future

Lest we forget what thousands of men and women did to fight for Canada’s freedoms – but without new membership, many Legion chapters face dwindling numbers

North Coast figure skater to star in Dancing On Ice

Carlotta Edwards learned to skate in Prince Rupert, before becoming a star with millions of viewers

Union pulls back on job action at Interior and northern mills

Legal strikes will discontinue for now as union is optimistic, vice president says

VIDEO: Marvel Comics’ Stan Lee dies

Marvel co-creator was well-known for making cameo appearances in superhero movies

Surging Rangers beat visiting Canucks 2-1

Goalie Lundqvist ties Plante on all-time wins list

VIDEO: Newcomer kids see first Canadian snowfall

Children arrived in Canada with their mother and two siblings last week from Eritrea

Calgary 2026 leader expects close vote in Winter Games plebiscite

Residents to choose in a non-binding vote on Tuesday whether they want city to bid on 2026 Olympics

Feds dropped ball with WWI anniversary tributes: historians

Wrote one historian: ‘Other than the Vimy Ridge celebration … I think they have done a very bad job’

Sides ‘far apart’ in Canada Post talks despite mediation, says union

The lack of a breakthrough means rotating strikes will resume Tuesday

Feds’ appeal of solitary confinement decision in B.C. to be heard

Judge ruled in January that indefinite such confinement is unconstitutional, causes permanent harm

B.C. health care payroll tax approved, takes effect Jan. 1

Employers calculating cost, including property taxes increases

Nunavut urges new plan to deal with too many polar bears

Territory recommends a proposal that contradicts much of conventional scientific thinking

Most Read