Salmon closures announced for Skeena and Nass watersheds

DFO notice expands on May 21 chinook ban throughout Skeena watershed

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans has announced widespread closures to recreational salmon fishing affecting all fresh water areas of the North Coast.

The notice, effective May 27, includes a ban on chinook in all lakes and rivers flowing into management areas 3 to 6. The announcement expands on a May 19 notice prohibiting chinook angling throughout the Skeena Watershed.

In an email to Black Press Media a DFO spokesperson said the restrictions are in response to a Skeena Chinook return estimate of just 38,754. It was noted there will be no targeted commercial fisheries on Skeena Chinook this year, and that the final Area F Commercial troll fishery will be timed to avoid the species.

READ MORE: COVID-19 guidelines for recreational fishing expected this week

“Overall, expectations for salmon returns are generally low and similar to last year,” the spokesperson wrote. “A key factor is the relatively poor conditions for ocean survival for the sea entry and freshwater rearing years for salmon returning in 2020.”

Today’s notice also reduces the allowable catch of North Coast coho to two, excluding the Kitimat River.

Bans on all salmon species are also now in effect until further notice for sections of the Skeena mainstem near the Kitwanga and Kispiox Rivers. Future prohibitions are planned for July 1 to Aug. 31 near and within the Kitsumkalum River.

Recreational fishing for chum salmon remains closed throughout the Skeena and Nass River watersheds.

A draft of the Integrated Fisheries Management Plan forewarned low Chinook returns will call for conservation measures similar to 2018, which saw widespread closures on all species.

READ MORE: Eight Northwest salmon conservation projects receive funding for grassroots work

The DFO spokesperson blamed the low numbers primarily on environmental factors, adding that while fisheries plans will be adjusted throughout the season to account for actual returns, further closures are a possibility.

“Given the anticipated ongoing impacts of the extremely warm water temperatures in the central North East Pacific ocean starting in late 2013 and the resulting changes in the marine food web – zooplankton composition, density, and distribution, as well as the potential for drought conditions through the summer and fall (leading to lower than normal flows and higher than normal water temperatures), there will likely be requirements for additional management actions to ensure adequate numbers of certain stocks have the opportunity to migrate up-river and spawn.”

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