Save-On-Foods has put a temporary halt on customers using reusable shopping bags and won’t be accepting bottle returns as of Friday, March 20. (Jenna Hauck/ Black Press file)

Save-On-Foods temporarily bans reusable shopping bags, suspends bottle returns due to COVID-19

It has also limited its operating hours and implemented special shopping hour for seniors

Customers won’t be able to use reusable shopping bags or return bottles at Save-On-Foods as of Friday.

The announcement came today in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic.

“Effective March 20, all 178 Save-On-Foods stores across Western Canada will provide plastic bags to customers free-of-charge until further notice,” reads the press release.

“Both our team members and customers have expressed concern about bottle returns and in using reusable bags at this time and we want to do everything we can to put them at ease,” said Save-On-Foods president Darrell Jones.

This comes the day after another announcement by the company. Yesterday, Save-On-Foods said it was limiting store hours and implementing special shopping hour for seniors effective today.

All stores now have the same hours of operation from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Limiting operating hours will give employees more time to clean, sanitize, and restock the shelves.

Additionally, all locations will open from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. for seniors, people with disabilities and those most vulnerable to shop in a less hectic environment and allow for social distancing, as recommended by health officials.

Save-On-Foods is also encouraging customers who can shop in-store to do so and leave the online shopping services available to those who are not able to get to the store, including seniors, people with disabilities and those who are ill or self-isolating.

RELATED: Resist the urge to panic shop despite COVID-19 fears, Trudeau says


 

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