A slow moving landslide is seen inching down a hillside in northern British Columbia, prompting the evacuation of nearby Old Fort, B.C., in an undated handout photo. (B.C. Ministry of Forests and Lands, Marten Geertsema)

Temporary access allowed for residents of landslide-threatened B.C. community

The district says areas of access to the community of about 54 homes could be expanded, depending on advice from a geotechnical engineer.

Some residents of the northeastern B.C. community of Old Fort are being allowed to briefly return to their homes after they were ordered out last week because of a slow-moving landslide.

The Peace River Regional District says on its website that residents with homes in the eastern portion of Old Fort, furthest from the slumping hillside, will be ferried up the Peace River to their properties, beginning at noon.

The district says areas of access to the community of about 54 homes could be expanded, depending on advice from a geotechnical engineer.

Those owners allowed to return will have a chance to retrieve belongings and prepare their homes for winter, but will not be allowed to remain on their properties.

The notice says temporary access permits will continue until all owners have had a chance to return to Old Fort, or as long as it’s safe to be in the area.

Re-entry permits were approved after a Sunday meeting with residents — two weeks after the hillside separating Old Fort from nearby Fort St. John began edging downhill, tearing up the only road to the community, knocking out power and threatening homes.

Related: Old Fort residents in holding pattern as landslide inches toward homes

Related: Northeast B.C. community cut off by slide has heat, power, but no answers

The Canadian Press

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