Former UBC creative writing professor Steve Galloway. (The Canadian Press)

UBC must pay fired author Steven Galloway $167,000 for privacy violation

Creative writing prof had filed grievances saying UBC had violated his privacy and harmed reputation

UBC must pay fired creative writing professor and author Steven Galloway $167,000 in damages for statements that violated his privacy rights and harmed his reputation.

A labour arbitration decision released Friday does not specifically say which communications infringed his privacy, but Galloway filed two grievances: one after he was suspended in November 2015 and another after he was fired in June 2016.

The first grievance asserted that UBC erred when it sent a memo to faculty, staff and students that announced Galloway had been suspended pending an investigation into “serious allegations.”

READ MORE: Sex assault supports vary in B.C. universities a year after provincial bill

The second grievance claimed the university’s communications about his termination, in which it said he was fired after an “irreparable breach of trust,” were misleading and caused serious damage to his reputation and ongoing suffering.

The university said in a statement that it accepts the decision of the arbitrator, who has ordered the school to pay Galloway $167,000.

The decision also reveals that in February 2018 the faculty association withdrew its claim on behalf of Galloway for reinstatement to his post, and for lost income and benefits.

In meant the issue of whether the university had cause to dismiss Galloway was no longer contested as part of the arbitration.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Community and collaboration drive Binche Fishing Derby

Family time, forward thinking and positive initiatives to be highlighted

Dr. Paul Stent awarded Key to the Community

On June 4, local physician Dr. Paul Stent was presented with the… Continue reading

Audit finds Canfor did not comply with bridge maintenance legislation

Per a news release issued by the Forest Practices board, an independent… Continue reading

Tenth B.C. Justice Summit continues dialogue on Indigenous justice

Per an information bulletin courtesy of the Ministry of Attorney General and… Continue reading

Fort St. James Taekwon Do enjoys success at provincials

The Fort St. James Family Taekwon Do team has achieved enormous success… Continue reading

Trudeau, Horgan condemn controversial U.S. child migrant policy

Premier John Horgan said B.C. ‘will always stand up for the values’ of diversity and inclusion

Canucks host all-inclusive birthday party for B.C. kids with autism

Such invitations are rare for some kids with autism, and one B.C. family knows the feeling

Heat records broken across B.C. as weather warning lifts

Thirteen records broken across B.C. on Tuesday

Alt-ed program brings mindfulness to the classroom

B.C. school leading the way in anxiety reduction strategies

Streaking fan levelled by BC Lions player hires lawyer

Toronto-based firm says the fan suffered injuries including a ‘mild traumatic brain injury’

Person involved in B.C. crash must wait longer to get their blood back

Judge extends blood seizure order as police conduct Surrey impaired driving investigation

Province expected to extend fish farm licenses another 4 years

An announcement on future of 20 fish farms off B.C. coast coming Wednesday afternoon

Humboldt survivors to attend NHL Awards

Players say it’s a blessing to be back together again

Justice minister: marijuana still illegal for now

Driving under the influence of drugs has always been — and will remain — against the law

Most Read