Are you going to turn off the lights for Earth Hour?

BC Hydro report says fewer people in the province are taking part, but feel it’s still important

Fewer people in B.C. have been participating in Earth Hour, but that doesn’t mean residents feel it is any less important.

That’s according to a report out Friday from BC Hydro, ahead of this year’s Earth Hour, set to take place on Saturday between 8:30 and 9:30 p.m. PT across the world. The event encourages everyone to turn off all unnecessary electricity and raise awareness fighting climate change.

Seven in 10 British Columbians surveyed said they intend to take part in Earth Hour this year, even though, as a province, we only reduced electricity use by 0.3 per cent last year.

BC Hydro suggests its largely hydroelectric generation may account for the lack of participation.

No surprise, the report suggests people mainly conserve power not to help save the environment, but to save money.

“While Earth Hour may have lost some of its momentum in B.C. in recent years, we still see this as a symbolic event – a way to raise awareness about energy conservation,” said BC Hydro president and COO Chris O’Riley.

You can check out your hourly breakdown of electricity use by logging into your online BC Hydro account.

BC Hydro’s tips on saving energy and cash:

1. Unplug that second fridge and save up to $90 per year.

2. Lower the thermostat to 21 degrees Celsius during the day and 16 degrees at night while sleeping to save up to $72 per year.

3. Unplug unused electronics and save $50 per year.

4. Hang dry laundry to save about $47 per year.

5. Be strategic with window coverings by keeping warm air in during the winter and cool air in during the summer to save about $45 per year.

6. Skip the dishwasher heat-dry setting and save up to $37 per year.

7. Cut one load of laundry per week by only running full loads and save $30 per year.

8. Reduce shower time by a minute to save $30 per year.

9. Wash laundry in cold water and save up to $27 per year.

10. Toss a dry towel in the dryer and save $27 per year.



laura.baziuk@bpdigital.ca

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